Circle of Fifths

The Circle of Fifths is an chart in music that rotates around the notes in fifths.

It is an important diagram that musicians can use, as it can help them know how notes relate to each other.

If I had infinite time I would learn and better understand the circle of fifths from the following tutorial:

Michael New concisely explains uses for the circle of fifths.
-Introduction to how it's made
-Mnemonics for memorising its order
-Finding the sharps and flats for each key
+ more

I'm pushing art, so unfortunately I cannot memorise it at this time.

But I think it's a great idea, and so I will post it to share the knowledge.

Maybe in future I can revisit this post for myself. Then I can learn it myself and become a better musician.

-M

Week 34: Painting Learning Paradox

Personal Ramble: Late post. I shouldn't consider the vlog and the blog to mirror each other. They should be thought of different mediums. And hence, require a different mindset. Thinking of both as the same this week caused me to have a questionable vlog- and also a lack of blog post.

Lately, I've been understanding painting a little bit more.

From taking Bill Perkin's Composition class at Concept Design Academy, I've become able to read images more fluently. This idea relates and goes back to art as a language. But essentially, when you learn to read images more fluently, you can deconstruct elements of the picture and understand how they are contributing to the overall whole.

With the picture as a language background/foundation in mind: I watched Marco Bucci's Painting Fundamentals video. I had seen this video before, and thought I understood completely. But now with increased painting knowledge I can more fully grasp what he is saying.

The Learning Paradox:
You Must Know An Idea BEFORE You Can Learn It,
but you Only Learn Ideas You Don’t Know

There is a paradox called the learning paradox. It's along the lines of "You must already know an idea before you can learn, but you only learn ideas you don't know".

Essentially when you 'really' know something you are able to fully articulate it. However, there are some things we think we know, but cannot explain it well with words. There is just a vague and ethereal 'knowingness' without complete rational justification.

Matt Moody a social psychologist with a Ph.D. in Social Psychology & Family Sociology, answers this paradox. He writes:

The key to unlocking this conundrum is in distinguishing the difference between Experience-Knowing, Word-Articulation-Knowing, and Whole-Knowing:
— http://www.calldrmatt.com/AskDrMatt-1237_Learning_Paradox_Explained.htm

Moody then explains that if you don't have any experience pertaining to the specific 'Word-Idea', then you cannot have the lightbulb of 'whole-knowing'. I think of it as, if you don't have a fuzzy cloud of experience in your mind, when words of electricity pass by, it has nothing to ignite. Concepts and ideas cannot spark in a vaccum. word-ideas will fly right by you, because you do not have the anchor of experience to ground them.

Whole-Knowing occurs when there is a cycle of words, ideas, and experience, building ones knowledge.

Reflecting back to painting- I could only ever understand what I had an experience of.

Previously, I had not looked at much art, nor understood visual elements. Therefore, without the experience, I did not have much mind haze in the realm of painting. Even though I had previously seen Marco Bucci's video, yesterday's second viewing taught me alot. On first viewing I thought I understood it all. But now I see it again with a cup more of art experience, his ideas spark 'whole-knowing' moments.

**Moody notes that this type of learning heavily reflects a conceptual type of knowing. The type of 'knowing' that involves mechanical learning, happens more directly in the experience of doing.

Door County Afternoon Gouache 5 1/2" x 11" by Richard Schmid

Door County Afternoon Gouache 5 1/2" x 11" by Richard Schmid

The more you know about something. The more fun it can become.

'Till next time!

-Mark

Week 10: I'm alive.

I'm watching time pass before me

I'm watching time pass before me

In terms of coding I've made it to the intermediate section of FCC. A random quote generator... It's pretty interesting. I've got the barebones down for the project. However I want to have the site and layout formatted nicely. To do so I need to understand jQuery in relation to HTML more. So that's definitely what will be happening this week.

I'm also usingthe dreaded console window (cmd). At this moment I'm following a tutorial on cmd, for how to use it with github. It's nothing special or necessarily hard. But I thought I'd write it down so I can more accurately see where I was in this point of time.

I've also started re-posting on medium.com. I figured i'd throttle them out, and slowly build up to where I am. The medium posts will make my internet presence wider.

Additionally I've added a new component to this website. The "Blog Index". My blog is getting too many posts to simply scroll down for everything. To remedy this I've included a "Blog Index" page. The page will archive all my posts in an organised fashion.

Good.

Progress...

Week 6: Routine.

Consistency through routine

Consistency through routine

Well it's week 6 now. Nothing was outstanding about this week. I'm okay with the progress.

I'm quite comfortable writing javascript now. It feels like it comes out much more naturally. I'm becoming used to the syntax. The reference websites are bookmarked. Everything I need to write is there.

I'm apparently doing 'interview level' javascript questions now. That's good. It'll come in handy. The path I'm following is http://freecodecamp.com 's algorithm scripting. I've done [7/17] challenges. By the end of this semester in art, I want to have achieved a front end development certificate :) Wish me luck!

Week 1 (aka Day 7)

Still in the canyon!

Still in the canyon!

And so a week has passed...

Coding is great. I’m doing it daily.

However compared to last post, I am no longer learning to make games with Java. I’ve decided that I’m going to start with something ‘easier’ and ‘more relevant’ to the idea of getting work asap. Understanding everything is greater than copying code. I had just been copying code learning Java.

I’ve just found Free Code Camp (FCC) and think the program and creators are super amazing. So amazing- that I’m determined to follow their track and learn whatever they have to offer. So far it has been great. I have just finished their HTML and CSS course. Here is a link to my profile: http://www.freecodecamp.com/volaix

Community

I truly believe that to move along long term in a skill it’s best to learn with others.

“In Africa we having a saying, ‘If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go together.” — Robin Jones Gunn, Coming Attractions

The FCC community is great! I’ve asked for help quite a few times in their chatrooms, and always get immediate response. I feel like I’ve already made friends in the community. It’s very motivating and I’m sure it’ll help me long term.


Some cool definitions learned this week:

Object-Oriented Programming (OOP): Where you program with a focus on objects. Software objects are often used to model real world objects.  (https://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/concepts/)

data modeling: A process used to define and analyse data. Data modeling is the process of learning about data. A data model is the result of the process (e.g. a flowchart). (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Data_modeling)

Software Architect: A software expert who makes design choices and sets technical standards. It'd be hilarious if I became a Software Architect, you know, having a Master in Architecture and all. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Software_architect)

Chief Architect: Apparently the Chief Architect is the leading expert of all the Software Architects. If I have a master in architecture. Can I be called master... chief? Masterchief? (Halo reference) (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Software_architect)

HTTP: Hypertext Transfer Protocol. Text based. Application layer protocol. Doesn't transmit data. Clients and servers exchange messages with a "request-resposne" system. HTTP is the common language. (https://medium.freecodecamp.com/how-the-web-works-part-iii-http-rest-e61bc50fa0a#.17l9gao54)

Angular 2 vs React: Angular is a framework, React is a library. With react you pull other libraries to build an app. With Angular you get more "premade" options out of the box, which helps to get started more quickly. (https://medium.freecodecamp.com/angular-2-versus-react-there-will-be-blood-66595faafd51#.gpr4ydjti)

jQuery: A small and fast Javascript library. (https://jquery.com/)

machine learning: Subfield of computer science, study of pattern recognition, and computational learning theory in AI. E.G. when you google "apple", google will know you're looking for the fruit and not the computers. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Machine_learning)

(HTML Tool) Using # in anchor links makes pseudo links

AARRR: Acquisition, Activatin, Retention, Revenue, Referral. A startup metrics model developed by Dave Mcclure. Used as a framework to understand and optimise businesses. (http://startitup.co/guides/374/aarrr-startup-metrics)

Hexdecimals. Wow. I've used hexdecimals for over 10 years. I've never once considered what they meant. Hex = 6. Decimals = 0.9 etc. Hexdecimals = combination of 6 letters A-F (6 'movements' of letters), and numbers. Hexdecimals work with RGB. The first two digits represent red, second two represent green, last two represent blue. #000000 = black #FFFFFF = white. F = highest value. 0 = lowest value. White is a mixture of all the colours in RGB. Black is the absence of colour. This probably sounds like nonsense to someone reading this, so I'll just have a link out explaining: http://www.bbc.co.uk/education/guides/zp73wmn/revision

Till next week!